Workout to Improve Gut Health

I openly hated working out. I have come full circle and now see the importance of a solid workout to improve gut health.

We are a few weeks into spring time and I wish for your gut health’s sake that this beautiful spring weather makes it easier for you to get outside and move your body. In this post, I aim to inspire you to workout to improve gut health.

Truth be told, working out used to be my weakest link in my health practices. I openly hated working out.

But what I noticed over the years was that I could be eating all the right things and carrying out lots of health promoting practices but without working out I could not reach the next level.

I have come full circle and now see the importance of a solid workout to improve gut health.

For me, regularly moving and using my body, was an important piece to getting my gut health in a solid place.

Now, I can go a couple of weeks without working out; but more than that I start to feel my tissues and body start to decline. I can feel my lymph system and digestive system start to clog up and my energy levels go down.

Walking as a Workout

Many will argue that walking is not a workout.

Patients in hospitals have walking on their checklist of important items to-do because moving the body is essential to health.

Walking is not usually high intensity, because it does get you to a point of sweating and heart pounding, but walking does make a difference in getting our lymph moving.

Our lymph system does not move on its own; it only moves when our muscles pump our blood. That stagnate feeling after a long plane ride or a long night sleep is the lymph system without movement.

Our lymph system relies on physical movement.

When our body is sick or overweight then walking is highly beneficial.

There were years in my life where I was overweight, fifty pounds a couple of times, and walking was basically all I could do. Stretching too. But it did not feel good to do anything more than walking and probably was not good for my joints and such.

Walking is great medicine.

If you are in another part of your gut health journey, meaning that you are relatively healthy, then I highly recommend getting into some high intensity training.

For me, high intensity training, was the final piece that stabilized my gut health.

The last few years, living from suit cases traveling and on cruise ships, I found that Shawn Ts Insanity is an efficient and effective full-body workout. I love it because it only requires some floor space AND it gets my whole body in shape in only thirty minutes.

Modern Day Stagnation

Moving our body used to be essential. But now life is automated and full of technologies that no longer require much physical exertion. So in order to maintain our body we must plan and engage in intentional physical activity.

Remember that our brain likes easy and is averted against hard. So we must understand that our brain does not want to workout.

The trick: use brain management in order to override our natural brain’s impulses to take the easy route.

But the long term downsides of not working out will cost us our health.

How to make working out easier

What I do is focus my brain on how I know I will feel after I workout: the incredible strength, energy levels, firmness, mental clarity, and the presence in my body. It is such a great feeling.

Instead of allowing my brain to focus on the yucky, icky, sluggish, sweaty, and achy sensations of working out- I focus on after.

This is how I motivate myself and how I manage my brain to get on board with my workout.

I hope you find use in this concept and you use it to get your body moving to whatever level you are at… and beyond. It is important to push our physical comfort levels while working out.

Workout to Improve Gut Health

If you are walking then push yourself by walking up hill.

If you are in good shape then do some high intensity and get your sweat on.

Go rock climbing. Rock climbing is hard and it is one of the most satisfying ways that I move my body.

How to Make Working Out Easier

Gut Health is Reversible

Accepting: “Hard is Normal”